July 2020

Table of Contents

Active Start to Ozone Season in West Michigan
Registration Open for 2020 Virtual GSI Seminar
Macatawa Watershed Agricultural Update
Scrap Tire Recycling Offered in Holland

Active Start to Ozone Season in West Michigan

In any given year, West Michigan can expect to see ground-level ozone start to ramp up around the month of July, since warm weather is usually needed for ozone formation.

Ground-level ozone is caused when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) from fuel combustion react with sunlight. Due to wind currents, ozone can occur hundreds of miles from where the VOCs and NOx are emitted, so it’s not just a big city problem. Here along the West Michigan shoreline, it’s not uncommon to have higher levels of ozone compared to inland. This is because the ozone has been “baking” over the highly reflective surface of Lake Michigan for many hours and hasn’t had the chance to be filtered out through miles of trees, buildings, and other factors.
Levels fluctuate from year to year based on a number of influences (heat, wind direction, air pressure, etc.). 2019 was a “Clean” year, but so far 2020 isn’t looking great for our statistics. By the end of June the Holland monitor had already gone above the allowable 70 parts per billion five times.
Check out the Clean Air Action Tip produced by Fox 17 to learn how you can help reduce ozone.

Back to Table of Contents

Registration Open for 2020 Virtual GSI Seminar

Click the image above to register. There is no cost to attend this virtual event. This seminar is eligible for up to 4 professional development hours for Professional Engineers and NGICP certified individuals.
The agenda and related information can be viewed here.
Questions? Contact Kelly at kgoward@the-macc.org

Back to Table of Contents

Macatawa Watershed Agricultural Update

Farmers in the Macatawa Watershed experienced one of the best planting seasons in recent memory. However a dry spell coupled with unusual heat quickly turned positive outlooks south as crops started to show the stress from the heat. Recent rains have helped but the affects the weather has on crop yields has yet to be revealed.
Dry conditions may not be ideal for crops but it has made conditions favorable to start other projects. The MACC has been working on a project for several years now and is excited to see dirt finally being moved. This project is funded by a grant from the Great Lakes Commission with support from Project Clarity. We are currently restructuring a streambank into a two-stage channel (pictured below) and constructing a livestock crossing to allow cows to access pasture on both sides of the stream. A two stage channel adds capacity to the stream channel allowing flood waters to be slowed down and sediment to be deposited in the floodplain.

The cattle crossing portion of this project involves constructing a rock crossing in the stream bed that is designed to Department of Agriculture, Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) specifications. Special permitting from Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy (EGLE) was needed to make this project happen. This permit was received in June after a slight modification to the plans, and paved the way to hiring a contractor to complete the project.  Once complete, fencing will be used to exclude cattle from the stream except at the livestock crossing.  We are excited to see the positive impact this project will have in the watershed.

The MACC is also currently working on finding other suitable sites to construct grassed waterways. Grassed waterways are installed and planted in areas where water flow is concentrated within an agricultural field. Grassed waterways help reduce erosion within that concentrated area as well as trap sediment that may be flowing from other portions of the field.  The MACC will also continue to promote and provide cost share for growers who are interested in planting cover crops. Cover crops have grown in popularity over the last few years and have provided many benefits to farmers as well as to the water quality in Lake Macatawa.

Questions and comments regarding agricultural conservation and available cost share can be directed to Rob Vink at rvink@the-macc.org

Back to Table of Contents

 

Scrap Tire Recycling Offered In Holland



Back to Table of Contents